Calif. AG won’t charge officers who killed Stephon Clark

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California's attorney general said Tuesday that he won't charge two Sacramento police officers who fatally shot an unarmed man last year, a killing that set off intense protests.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra's conclusion to a nearly yearlong investigation follows a Sacramento district attorney finding last weekend that the officers broke no laws when they shot 22-year-old Stephon Clark.

Officers Terrance Mercadal and Jared Robinet said they mistakenly thought Clark was approaching them with a gun after he ran from them into his grandparents' backyard as police investigated vandalism. Investigators found only a cellphone.

Becerra acknowledged that the killing was devastating for Clark's family but that his review found Clark had been committing crimes and officers believed he was armed and their lives were in danger when they opened fire.

Becerra, who called for changes in law enforcement practices to prevent other shootings, said there was plenty of evidence to support his conclusion. Still, he said it was not an easy decision.

"There's a young man who's no longer alive," Becerra said. "Two sons who won't have a father. Whose mother I just met is still grieving. Of course it was a tough call. These are all tough calls. It's never easy."

Before announcing the decision, he met with Clark's mother, SeQuette Clark, who was expected to speak to reporters later in the day.

Clark was shot seven times on March 18, 2018, and his killing prompted protests in California's capital city and across the U.S.

New demonstrations followed Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert's decision not to charge the officers, with more than 80 people arrested Monday in a wealthy Sacramento neighborhood.

Clark's family and black community leaders urged Becerra to reach a different conclusion.

"I would like for the attorney general to prosecute the officers," brother Stevante Clark said Sunday. "I want justice and accountability."

Both Becerra and Schubert concluded that the officers feared for their lives when they shot Clark, who they thought was holding a gun. They were pursuing him after receiving calls about someone breaking car windows and a neighbor's sliding glass door.

The attorney general and district attorney said the evidence showed Clark was advancing toward the officers holding what they thought was a gun when they shot him.

Top state officials are supporting changes to California's legal standard for when police can use deadly force.

Lawmakers have revived a measure introduced after Clark's slaying that would make California the first state to allow police to use deadly force only when it's necessary to prevent imminent and serious injury or death and if there's no reasonable alternative, such as warnings or other methods.

Strong opposition from law enforcement agencies stalled it last year.

Becerra was vague about what reforms he would support but said change was needed.

"This incident reads like the bitterly familiar passages of a long, complicated and uninviting book," he said. "We must all be willing to write the next chapters in this story of what we call American justice."

March 05, 2019 at 12:33PM https://ift.tt/2C4CuM6

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Calif. AG won’t charge officers who killed Stephon Clark

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California's attorney general said Tuesday that he won't charge two Sacramento police officers who fatally shot an unarmed man last year, a killing that set off intense protests.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra's conclusion to a nearly yearlong investigation follows a Sacramento district attorney finding last weekend that the officers broke no laws when they shot 22-year-old Stephon Clark.

Officers Terrance Mercadal and Jared Robinet said they mistakenly thought Clark was approaching them with a gun after he ran from them into his grandparents' backyard as police investigated vandalism. Investigators found only a cellphone.

Becerra acknowledged that the killing was devastating for Clark's family but that his review found Clark had been committing crimes and officers believed he was armed and their lives were in danger when they opened fire.

Becerra, who called for changes in law enforcement practices to prevent other shootings, said there was plenty of evidence to support his conclusion. Still, he said it was not an easy decision.

"There's a young man who's no longer alive," Becerra said. "Two sons who won't have a father. Whose mother I just met is still grieving. Of course it was a tough call. These are all tough calls. It's never easy."

Before announcing the decision, he met with Clark's mother, SeQuette Clark, who was expected to speak to reporters later in the day.

Clark was shot seven times on March 18, 2018, and his killing prompted protests in California's capital city and across the U.S.

New demonstrations followed Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert's decision not to charge the officers, with more than 80 people arrested Monday in a wealthy Sacramento neighborhood.

Clark's family and black community leaders urged Becerra to reach a different conclusion.

"I would like for the attorney general to prosecute the officers," brother Stevante Clark said Sunday. "I want justice and accountability."

Both Becerra and Schubert concluded that the officers feared for their lives when they shot Clark, who they thought was holding a gun. They were pursuing him after receiving calls about someone breaking car windows and a neighbor's sliding glass door.

The attorney general and district attorney said the evidence showed Clark was advancing toward the officers holding what they thought was a gun when they shot him.

Top state officials are supporting changes to California's legal standard for when police can use deadly force.

Lawmakers have revived a measure introduced after Clark's slaying that would make California the first state to allow police to use deadly force only when it's necessary to prevent imminent and serious injury or death and if there's no reasonable alternative, such as warnings or other methods.

Strong opposition from law enforcement agencies stalled it last year.

Becerra was vague about what reforms he would support but said change was needed.

"This incident reads like the bitterly familiar passages of a long, complicated and uninviting book," he said. "We must all be willing to write the next chapters in this story of what we call American justice."

March 05, 2019 at 12:33PM https://ift.tt/2C4CuM6

U.S. Obtains Over $25 Million in Forfeited Funds as Part of a Successful Effort to Root Out Fraud and Corruption in Government Contracting in Afghanistan

“The United States relies on government contractors to supply and resupply our military with vital resources they require to carry out critical missions,” said Assistant Attorney General Hunt.  “We will continue to ensure that companies and individuals who contract directly or indirectly with the federal government do not engage in fraudulent business practices at the expense of our nation’s military and the American taxpayer.” March 04, 2019 at 07:00PM https://ift.tt/2UkU19T

Calif. AG won’t charge officers who killed Stephon Clark

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California's attorney general said Tuesday that he won't charge two Sacramento police officers who fatally shot an unarmed man last year, a killing that set off intense protests.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra's conclusion to a nearly yearlong investigation follows a Sacramento district attorney finding last weekend that the officers broke no laws when they shot 22-year-old Stephon Clark.

Officers Terrance Mercadal and Jared Robinet said they mistakenly thought Clark was approaching them with a gun after he ran from them into his grandparents' backyard as police investigated vandalism. Investigators found only a cellphone.

Becerra acknowledged that the killing was devastating for Clark's family but that his review found Clark had been committing crimes and officers believed he was armed and their lives were in danger when they opened fire.

Becerra, who called for changes in law enforcement practices to prevent other shootings, said there was plenty of evidence to support his conclusion. Still, he said it was not an easy decision.

"There's a young man who's no longer alive," Becerra said. "Two sons who won't have a father. Whose mother I just met is still grieving. Of course it was a tough call. These are all tough calls. It's never easy."

Before announcing the decision, he met with Clark's mother, SeQuette Clark, who was expected to speak to reporters later in the day.

Clark was shot seven times on March 18, 2018, and his killing prompted protests in California's capital city and across the U.S.

New demonstrations followed Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert's decision not to charge the officers, with more than 80 people arrested Monday in a wealthy Sacramento neighborhood.

Clark's family and black community leaders urged Becerra to reach a different conclusion.

"I would like for the attorney general to prosecute the officers," brother Stevante Clark said Sunday. "I want justice and accountability."

Both Becerra and Schubert concluded that the officers feared for their lives when they shot Clark, who they thought was holding a gun. They were pursuing him after receiving calls about someone breaking car windows and a neighbor's sliding glass door.

The attorney general and district attorney said the evidence showed Clark was advancing toward the officers holding what they thought was a gun when they shot him.

Top state officials are supporting changes to California's legal standard for when police can use deadly force.

Lawmakers have revived a measure introduced after Clark's slaying that would make California the first state to allow police to use deadly force only when it's necessary to prevent imminent and serious injury or death and if there's no reasonable alternative, such as warnings or other methods.

Strong opposition from law enforcement agencies stalled it last year.

Becerra was vague about what reforms he would support but said change was needed.

"This incident reads like the bitterly familiar passages of a long, complicated and uninviting book," he said. "We must all be willing to write the next chapters in this story of what we call American justice."

March 05, 2019 at 12:33PM https://ift.tt/2C4CuM6

Calif. AG won’t charge officers who killed Stephon Clark

null

Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California's attorney general said Tuesday that he won't charge two Sacramento police officers who fatally shot an unarmed man last year, a killing that set off intense protests.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra's conclusion to a nearly yearlong investigation follows a Sacramento district attorney finding last weekend that the officers broke no laws when they shot 22-year-old Stephon Clark.

Officers Terrance Mercadal and Jared Robinet said they mistakenly thought Clark was approaching them with a gun after he ran from them into his grandparents' backyard as police investigated vandalism. Investigators found only a cellphone.

Becerra acknowledged that the killing was devastating for Clark's family but that his review found Clark had been committing crimes and officers believed he was armed and their lives were in danger when they opened fire.

Becerra, who called for changes in law enforcement practices to prevent other shootings, said there was plenty of evidence to support his conclusion. Still, he said it was not an easy decision.

"There's a young man who's no longer alive," Becerra said. "Two sons who won't have a father. Whose mother I just met is still grieving. Of course it was a tough call. These are all tough calls. It's never easy."

Before announcing the decision, he met with Clark's mother, SeQuette Clark, who was expected to speak to reporters later in the day.

Clark was shot seven times on March 18, 2018, and his killing prompted protests in California's capital city and across the U.S.

New demonstrations followed Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert's decision not to charge the officers, with more than 80 people arrested Monday in a wealthy Sacramento neighborhood.

Clark's family and black community leaders urged Becerra to reach a different conclusion.

"I would like for the attorney general to prosecute the officers," brother Stevante Clark said Sunday. "I want justice and accountability."

Both Becerra and Schubert concluded that the officers feared for their lives when they shot Clark, who they thought was holding a gun. They were pursuing him after receiving calls about someone breaking car windows and a neighbor's sliding glass door.

The attorney general and district attorney said the evidence showed Clark was advancing toward the officers holding what they thought was a gun when they shot him.

Top state officials are supporting changes to California's legal standard for when police can use deadly force.

Lawmakers have revived a measure introduced after Clark's slaying that would make California the first state to allow police to use deadly force only when it's necessary to prevent imminent and serious injury or death and if there's no reasonable alternative, such as warnings or other methods.

Strong opposition from law enforcement agencies stalled it last year.

Becerra was vague about what reforms he would support but said change was needed.

"This incident reads like the bitterly familiar passages of a long, complicated and uninviting book," he said. "We must all be willing to write the next chapters in this story of what we call American justice."

March 05, 2019 at 12:33PM https://ift.tt/2C4CuM6

Union appeals firing of officer who fatally shot Tamir Rice

null

Associated Press

CLEVELAND — A police union says it has appealed the firing of a Cleveland police officer who fatally shot a 12-year-old boy playing with a pellet gun.

Henry Hilow, an attorney for the Cleveland Police Patrolmen's Association, and union President Jeff Follmer say the appeal challenging an arbitrator's decision that Timothy Loehmann should remained fired was filed recently in Cuyahoga (ky-uh-HOH'-guh) County.

Loehmann was cleared in Tamir Rice's 2014 shooting but fired in 2017 for failing to disclose to Cleveland he'd been previously forced out by another department. The city's arbitrator in December 2018 upheld Loehmann's firing.

Cleveland spokesman Dan Williams says the city doesn't comment on ongoing litigation.

The Rice family attorney Subodh Chandra says in a statement it's "unfortunate" the union "continues to embrace lawlessness in law enforcement."

March 05, 2019 at 11:08AM https://ift.tt/2H2CvEz

Tottenham Hotspur are through to the quarter-finals of the Champions League after beating Borussia Dortmund 1-0 in the second leg of their last 16 tie giving them a 4-0 win on aggregate while defending champions Real Madrid have been knocked out by Ajax in their last 16 leg

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