Chicago cop says he faces retaliation over shooting report

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer says in a lawsuit filed Monday that his bosses retaliated against him for refusing to change a police report to list a sergeant who shot and wounded an unarmed, autistic man as the victim.

Sgt. Isaac Lambert was assigned to investigate the August 2017 shooting of Ricardo "Ricky" Hayes by Sgt. Khalil Muhammad who was off duty at the time. Hayes, who is black, was 18 when the shooting happened.

In his lawsuit filed electronically in Cook County Circuit Court, Lambert says his bosses dumped him from the detective division last month, days after he refused to change the report, the Chicago Tribune reported. The lawsuit is against the city of Chicago. City officials could not be reached for comment Monday.

Surveillance video was released in October by the Civilian Office of Police Accountability that shows Muhammad shooting the unarmed Hayes, contradicting an initial police description of an armed confrontation. The grainy video was from a security camera on a home on Chicago's South Side.

Hayes' caretaker had called police to say Hayes had wandered away from home and that he has developmental disabilities.

Before the shooting, Hayes can be seen running along the sidewalk then stopping. Muhammad pulls up alongside, with parked cars between them. Hayes takes a few steps toward him and shoots Hayes in the arm and chest. Hayes turns and runs, despite his wounds.

In a federal lawsuit filed on Hayes' behalf, Muhammad has denied any wrongdoing, court records show. He was placed indefinitely on paid desk duty after the shooting.

Lambert's lawsuit alleges Muhammad called Hayes over to his personal vehicle after spotting him "skipping and running" near his residence about 5 a.m. Hayes, who was about 20 feet (6 meters) from the vehicle, took about four steps toward Muhammad's vehicle when the sergeant opened fire.

Video from the home security camera shows Hayes never did anything to threaten Muhammad or give him any reason to open fire, Lambert alleges.

Later, at Area South detective headquarters, Muhammad "was not able to provide a coherent or believable explanation" for why he shot Hayes, according to Lambert's lawsuit.

March 05, 2019 at 12:53PM https://ift.tt/2EDhRas

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Chicago cop says he faces retaliation over shooting report

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer says in a lawsuit filed Monday that his bosses retaliated against him for refusing to change a police report to list a sergeant who shot and wounded an unarmed, autistic man as the victim.

Sgt. Isaac Lambert was assigned to investigate the August 2017 shooting of Ricardo "Ricky" Hayes by Sgt. Khalil Muhammad who was off duty at the time. Hayes, who is black, was 18 when the shooting happened.

In his lawsuit filed electronically in Cook County Circuit Court, Lambert says his bosses dumped him from the detective division last month, days after he refused to change the report, the Chicago Tribune reported. The lawsuit is against the city of Chicago. City officials could not be reached for comment Monday.

Surveillance video was released in October by the Civilian Office of Police Accountability that shows Muhammad shooting the unarmed Hayes, contradicting an initial police description of an armed confrontation. The grainy video was from a security camera on a home on Chicago's South Side.

Hayes' caretaker had called police to say Hayes had wandered away from home and that he has developmental disabilities.

Before the shooting, Hayes can be seen running along the sidewalk then stopping. Muhammad pulls up alongside, with parked cars between them. Hayes takes a few steps toward him and shoots Hayes in the arm and chest. Hayes turns and runs, despite his wounds.

In a federal lawsuit filed on Hayes' behalf, Muhammad has denied any wrongdoing, court records show. He was placed indefinitely on paid desk duty after the shooting.

Lambert's lawsuit alleges Muhammad called Hayes over to his personal vehicle after spotting him "skipping and running" near his residence about 5 a.m. Hayes, who was about 20 feet (6 meters) from the vehicle, took about four steps toward Muhammad's vehicle when the sergeant opened fire.

Video from the home security camera shows Hayes never did anything to threaten Muhammad or give him any reason to open fire, Lambert alleges.

Later, at Area South detective headquarters, Muhammad "was not able to provide a coherent or believable explanation" for why he shot Hayes, according to Lambert's lawsuit.

March 05, 2019 at 12:53PM https://ift.tt/2EDhRas

Chicago cop says he faces retaliation over shooting report

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer says in a lawsuit filed Monday that his bosses retaliated against him for refusing to change a police report to list a sergeant who shot and wounded an unarmed, autistic man as the victim.

Sgt. Isaac Lambert was assigned to investigate the August 2017 shooting of Ricardo "Ricky" Hayes by Sgt. Khalil Muhammad who was off duty at the time. Hayes, who is black, was 18 when the shooting happened.

In his lawsuit filed electronically in Cook County Circuit Court, Lambert says his bosses dumped him from the detective division last month, days after he refused to change the report, the Chicago Tribune reported. The lawsuit is against the city of Chicago. City officials could not be reached for comment Monday.

Surveillance video was released in October by the Civilian Office of Police Accountability that shows Muhammad shooting the unarmed Hayes, contradicting an initial police description of an armed confrontation. The grainy video was from a security camera on a home on Chicago's South Side.

Hayes' caretaker had called police to say Hayes had wandered away from home and that he has developmental disabilities.

Before the shooting, Hayes can be seen running along the sidewalk then stopping. Muhammad pulls up alongside, with parked cars between them. Hayes takes a few steps toward him and shoots Hayes in the arm and chest. Hayes turns and runs, despite his wounds.

In a federal lawsuit filed on Hayes' behalf, Muhammad has denied any wrongdoing, court records show. He was placed indefinitely on paid desk duty after the shooting.

Lambert's lawsuit alleges Muhammad called Hayes over to his personal vehicle after spotting him "skipping and running" near his residence about 5 a.m. Hayes, who was about 20 feet (6 meters) from the vehicle, took about four steps toward Muhammad's vehicle when the sergeant opened fire.

Video from the home security camera shows Hayes never did anything to threaten Muhammad or give him any reason to open fire, Lambert alleges.

Later, at Area South detective headquarters, Muhammad "was not able to provide a coherent or believable explanation" for why he shot Hayes, according to Lambert's lawsuit.

March 05, 2019 at 12:53PM https://ift.tt/2EDhRas

Chicago cop says he faces retaliation over shooting report

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer says in a lawsuit filed Monday that his bosses retaliated against him for refusing to change a police report to list a sergeant who shot and wounded an unarmed, autistic man as the victim.

Sgt. Isaac Lambert was assigned to investigate the August 2017 shooting of Ricardo "Ricky" Hayes by Sgt. Khalil Muhammad who was off duty at the time. Hayes, who is black, was 18 when the shooting happened.

In his lawsuit filed electronically in Cook County Circuit Court, Lambert says his bosses dumped him from the detective division last month, days after he refused to change the report, the Chicago Tribune reported. The lawsuit is against the city of Chicago. City officials could not be reached for comment Monday.

Surveillance video was released in October by the Civilian Office of Police Accountability that shows Muhammad shooting the unarmed Hayes, contradicting an initial police description of an armed confrontation. The grainy video was from a security camera on a home on Chicago's South Side.

Hayes' caretaker had called police to say Hayes had wandered away from home and that he has developmental disabilities.

Before the shooting, Hayes can be seen running along the sidewalk then stopping. Muhammad pulls up alongside, with parked cars between them. Hayes takes a few steps toward him and shoots Hayes in the arm and chest. Hayes turns and runs, despite his wounds.

In a federal lawsuit filed on Hayes' behalf, Muhammad has denied any wrongdoing, court records show. He was placed indefinitely on paid desk duty after the shooting.

Lambert's lawsuit alleges Muhammad called Hayes over to his personal vehicle after spotting him "skipping and running" near his residence about 5 a.m. Hayes, who was about 20 feet (6 meters) from the vehicle, took about four steps toward Muhammad's vehicle when the sergeant opened fire.

Video from the home security camera shows Hayes never did anything to threaten Muhammad or give him any reason to open fire, Lambert alleges.

Later, at Area South detective headquarters, Muhammad "was not able to provide a coherent or believable explanation" for why he shot Hayes, according to Lambert's lawsuit.

March 05, 2019 at 12:53PM https://ift.tt/2EDhRas

Chicago cop says he faces retaliation over shooting report

Associated Press

CHICAGO — A Chicago police officer says in a lawsuit filed Monday that his bosses retaliated against him for refusing to change a police report to list a sergeant who shot and wounded an unarmed, autistic man as the victim.

Sgt. Isaac Lambert was assigned to investigate the August 2017 shooting of Ricardo "Ricky" Hayes by Sgt. Khalil Muhammad who was off duty at the time. Hayes, who is black, was 18 when the shooting happened.

In his lawsuit filed electronically in Cook County Circuit Court, Lambert says his bosses dumped him from the detective division last month, days after he refused to change the report, the Chicago Tribune reported. The lawsuit is against the city of Chicago. City officials could not be reached for comment Monday.

Surveillance video was released in October by the Civilian Office of Police Accountability that shows Muhammad shooting the unarmed Hayes, contradicting an initial police description of an armed confrontation. The grainy video was from a security camera on a home on Chicago's South Side.

Hayes' caretaker had called police to say Hayes had wandered away from home and that he has developmental disabilities.

Before the shooting, Hayes can be seen running along the sidewalk then stopping. Muhammad pulls up alongside, with parked cars between them. Hayes takes a few steps toward him and shoots Hayes in the arm and chest. Hayes turns and runs, despite his wounds.

In a federal lawsuit filed on Hayes' behalf, Muhammad has denied any wrongdoing, court records show. He was placed indefinitely on paid desk duty after the shooting.

Lambert's lawsuit alleges Muhammad called Hayes over to his personal vehicle after spotting him "skipping and running" near his residence about 5 a.m. Hayes, who was about 20 feet (6 meters) from the vehicle, took about four steps toward Muhammad's vehicle when the sergeant opened fire.

Video from the home security camera shows Hayes never did anything to threaten Muhammad or give him any reason to open fire, Lambert alleges.

Later, at Area South detective headquarters, Muhammad "was not able to provide a coherent or believable explanation" for why he shot Hayes, according to Lambert's lawsuit.

March 05, 2019 at 12:53PM https://ift.tt/2EDhRas

Calif. AG won’t charge officers who killed Stephon Clark

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Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California's attorney general said Tuesday that he won't charge two Sacramento police officers who fatally shot an unarmed man last year, a killing that set off intense protests.

Attorney General Xavier Becerra's conclusion to a nearly yearlong investigation follows a Sacramento district attorney finding last weekend that the officers broke no laws when they shot 22-year-old Stephon Clark.

Officers Terrance Mercadal and Jared Robinet said they mistakenly thought Clark was approaching them with a gun after he ran from them into his grandparents' backyard as police investigated vandalism. Investigators found only a cellphone.

Becerra acknowledged that the killing was devastating for Clark's family but that his review found Clark had been committing crimes and officers believed he was armed and their lives were in danger when they opened fire.

Becerra, who called for changes in law enforcement practices to prevent other shootings, said there was plenty of evidence to support his conclusion. Still, he said it was not an easy decision.

"There's a young man who's no longer alive," Becerra said. "Two sons who won't have a father. Whose mother I just met is still grieving. Of course it was a tough call. These are all tough calls. It's never easy."

Before announcing the decision, he met with Clark's mother, SeQuette Clark, who was expected to speak to reporters later in the day.

Clark was shot seven times on March 18, 2018, and his killing prompted protests in California's capital city and across the U.S.

New demonstrations followed Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert's decision not to charge the officers, with more than 80 people arrested Monday in a wealthy Sacramento neighborhood.

Clark's family and black community leaders urged Becerra to reach a different conclusion.

"I would like for the attorney general to prosecute the officers," brother Stevante Clark said Sunday. "I want justice and accountability."

Both Becerra and Schubert concluded that the officers feared for their lives when they shot Clark, who they thought was holding a gun. They were pursuing him after receiving calls about someone breaking car windows and a neighbor's sliding glass door.

The attorney general and district attorney said the evidence showed Clark was advancing toward the officers holding what they thought was a gun when they shot him.

Top state officials are supporting changes to California's legal standard for when police can use deadly force.

Lawmakers have revived a measure introduced after Clark's slaying that would make California the first state to allow police to use deadly force only when it's necessary to prevent imminent and serious injury or death and if there's no reasonable alternative, such as warnings or other methods.

Strong opposition from law enforcement agencies stalled it last year.

Becerra was vague about what reforms he would support but said change was needed.

"This incident reads like the bitterly familiar passages of a long, complicated and uninviting book," he said. "We must all be willing to write the next chapters in this story of what we call American justice."

March 05, 2019 at 12:33PM https://ift.tt/2C4CuM6